CSA Teams Up With UNAC

Ottawa, Ontario – The Canadian Soccer Association and the United Nations Association in Canada have joined forces to promote the Global Peace Games 2001 for Children and Youth and commemorate the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010).

Ottawa, Ontario – The Canadian Soccer Association and the United Nations Association in Canada have joined forces to promote the Global Peace Games 2001 for Children and Youth and commemorate the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World (2001-2010).
During September and October 2001, children and youth around the world will be taking part in friendly soccer games that emphasize leadership and involve children and youth in making decisions about their lives. The soccer games recognize the centrality of children and youth in the International Decade, and highlight their role in building a world that meets the needs and rights of every child and youth. The games also present an opportunity to broadly involve non-governmental organizations, educational institutions, artists and the media in activities that benefit children.
In order to link the participants in the games and celebrations, the UNESCO Manifesto for a Culture of Peace is being used at the events all over the world. The Manifesto is a vehicle that speaks to people everywhere, offering an opportunity to transform the culture of war and violence into a culture of peace and non-violence. It appeals to individual commitment and responsibility. The Manifesto will be read and pledged to by children and youth participating at each site, and their signatures will be obtained on a copy of the Manifesto. The global aggregate of these signatures will be forwarded to the Secretary-General of the United Nations.
At the National Club Championships, being held in Charlottetown (PEI), Edmonton (Alberta) and Montreal (Quebec), players, officials, parents and organizers will be encouraged to sign the posters which will then be sent to the United Nations in New York as a symbol of their support.
The Global Peace Games are taking place in countries around the world, including Cameroon, China, Costa Rica, Honduras, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Lesotho, Panama, Romania, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, USA, Zambia and countries in Central Asia. Friendly soccer matches at the facilities/fields financed by FIFA will highlight fair play, respect for others and friendship.
The United Nation’s Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, and Mr. Adolf Ogi, the Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Sport for Peace and Development, have lent their encouragement to the Global Peace Games 2001. A special message from both the Secretary-General and his Special Adviser will be read at the Global Peace Games.

Guidelines for the Return to Soccer

Canada Soccer outlines return to soccer guidelines. The return to soccer guidelines provide member organizations with a five-step process, including a checklist of weighted questions known as the Return to Soccer Assessment Tool.